Summer Reading 2017 - 11th Grade

  • APPLIED ENGLISH 11

    The following summer reading choices represent high interest young adult fiction appealing to a variety of readers.

    Applied Communications 11 students should choose ONE of the following books to read:

    Starred* titles are available in electronic book form on Overdrive.  See our school library website for more information.

    As you read, you will complete five journal entries (see prompts below), either in hard copy or electronic format. Each journal entry should be at least five sentences in length.  Use the questions provided to get you started if you are unsure of what to write.  Bring your journal with you on the first day of school.  You will be completing a summer reading assignment/project during the first week.

    Journal Prompts:

    Journal One: Discuss a character from the novel that you find intriguing.  What about the character interests you?  What role does the character play in the story?  Be sure to include any interesting details or qualities you learn about the character as you read.   

    Journal Two:  Locate one quote in the book and record it (include page number).  Analyze the meaning of the quote and explain its importance to the story.  How did this particular quote have an affect on your reading?  For example, did the author use it to foreshadow an event?  Was an important character trait revealed?  Was the quote used to pique your curiosity about a situation?

    Journal Three: Write about a personal connection you were able to make to some aspect of the book.  Did a character remind you of someone in your life?  Did something in the book happen that made you reflect on a similar personal experience?  Did the story inspire you to make a decision or change about something?  

    Journal Four:  Discuss your favorite or least favorite part of the book.  Be sure to explain why this part stood out to you.  Did it make you happy, sad, angry, etc.?  Were you surprised by what happened?  

    Journal Five:  Write a review of your book, providing a brief summary of the story.  Be sure to include if you would recommend it to other students.  On a scale of 1-5 (1 being the lowest, 5 being the highest) rate your book.  Be sure to explain why you would assign it that particular rating.   

    Option B: News Events Journal

    Using the journal outline guide (provided to you by your 11th grade teacher), keep a reaction journal about FIVE news events that took place over the summer.   

    • Each should be about a half page long.

    • Include a summary of the story and your reaction/thoughts about it.

    • When you return to school, you will write a reflection paper summarizing the events that took place on a global scale over the summer and think about your future as you prepare to graduate.

    -OR-

    Option C: Employment Journal

    If you were employed over the summer, keep a journal about your work experience.  Write down the positives, negatives, and any learning experiences you had.  Is the job you had one that you would want to pursue as a career? Or was it simply to make some money during your summer break?

    • Write about one page per week, and summarize your experience.

    • When you return to school, you will turn in your employment journal and write a reflection paper based on your employment and what your future goals are.

     



    ENGLISH 11 CP – World Literature

    The 11th grade English course provides a study of world literature.  The following list of modern and contemporary works by world authors includes literary fiction and nonfiction reflecting a variety of cultures and themes.

    Starred* titles are available in electronic book form on Overdrive.  See our school library website for more information.

    English 11 CP students MUST read the following required book:

    Contemporary Fiction

    English 11 CP students must read ONE of the following choices:

    Modern and Contemporary Fiction

       Literary Non-Fiction

    Expectations:

    As you read, you will use hand written Post-it notes to highlight key passages in terms of plot, character development and major themes. You will need to record 20 annotations (Post-it notes) for the required reading and ten notes for the other work of your choosing.  Your annotations should not simply summarize the text, but show your thinking and your responses to the reading.  Bring your annotations with you on the first day of school.  You will be completing a summer reading assignment/project during the first week in which you may use the annotations you submit on the first day.

    Metacognitive Log Prompts/Stems to help get you started with your annotations:

    • I felt confused when…and so I…

    • I remembered that earlier in the text…

    • A word/some words I did not know:

    • I first thought…but then realized…

    • I finally understood…because…

    • A connection I made:

    • A prediction I made was…because…

    • I was surprised when…because



    HONORS ENGLISH 11 – World Literature

    The 11th grade English course provides a study of world literature.  The following list of modern and contemporary works by world authors includes literary fiction and nonfiction reflecting a variety of cultures and themes.

    Starred* titles are available in electronic book form on Overdrive.  See our school library website for more information.

    GROUP A - Major Course Themes: Shakespeare & the Holocaust  (Choose ONE):

    GROUP B - Nineteenth Century European Literature  (Choose ONE):

    GROUP C - Twentieth Century World Literature  (Choose ONE):

    Expectations:

    As you read, you will use hand written Post-it notes to highlight key passages in terms of plot, character development and major themes. You will need to record 20 annotations per required text.  Your annotations should not simply summarize the text, but show your thinking and your responses to the reading.  Bring your annotations with you on the first day of school.  You will be completing a summer reading assessment during the first week in which you may use the annotations you submit on the first day. Make sure to include a final reflective/evaluative entry upon the conclusion of each text.  Your annotations should not simply summarize the text, but show your thinking and your responses to the reading. You can make predictions, make connections between this text and another text, historical events, or personal experiences. You can also ask questions of the text, of the characters' motives, of the author, or about something confusing you.  You may write about things that surprise you, make you mad, upset you, or that you think are cool. 

    Metacognitive Log Prompts/Stems to help get you started:

    • I felt confused when…and so I…

    • I remembered that earlier in the text…

    • A word/some words I did not know:

    • I first thought…but then realized…

    • I finally understood…because…

    • A connection I made:

    • An image I had in my head:

    • A prediction I made was…because…

    • I was surprised when…because

    • Questions for the author, for the characters, etc.

    IMPORTANT!  You will be assessed on ALL THREE required readings during the first week of school via formal assessment.