Summer Reading 2017 - 12th Grade

  • APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS 12

    The following options provide opportunities for reading and/or reflective writing that appeals to a variety of students and provides appropriate differentiation for individual student needs as they transition into the final high school year.

     12 Applied Summer Reading: Choose ONE of the following summer reading activities: book review, employment journal, or current events journal.

    Option A: Book Review – Choose ONE of the following books to read.

    Starred* titles are available in electronic book form on Overdrive.  See our school library website for more information.

    As you read, you will complete five journal entries (see prompts below), either in hard copy or electronic format. Each journal entry should be at least five sentences in length.  Use the questions provided to get you started if you are unsure of what to write.  Bring your journal with you on the first day of school.  You will be completing a summer reading assignment/project during the first week.

    Journal Prompts:

    Journal One: Discuss a character from the novel that you find intriguing.  What about the character interests you?  What role does the character play in the story?  Be sure to include any interesting details or qualities you learn about the character as you read.   

    Journal Two:  Locate one quote in the book and record it (include page number).  Analyze the meaning of the quote and explain its importance to the story.  How did this particular quote have an affect on your reading?  For example, did the author use it to foreshadow an event?  Was an important character trait revealed?  Was the quote used to pique your curiosity about a situation?

    Journal Three: Write about a personal connection you were able to make to some aspect of the book.  Did a character remind you of someone in your life?  Did something in the book happen that made you reflect on a similar personal experience?  Did the story inspire you to make a decision or change about something?  

    Journal Four:  Discuss your favorite or least favorite part of the book.  Be sure to explain why this part stood out to you.  Did it make you happy, sad, angry, etc.?  Were you surprised by what happened?  

    Journal Five:  Write a review of your book, providing a brief summary of the story.  Be sure to include if you would recommend it to other students.  On a scale of 1-5 (1 being the lowest, 5 being the highest) rate your book.  Be sure to explain why you would assign it that particular rating.   

    -OR-

     

    Option B: News Events Journal

    Using the journal outline guide (provided to you by your 11th grade teacher), keep a reaction journal about FIVE news events that took place over the summer.   

    • Each should be about a half page long.

    • Include a summary of the story and your reaction/thoughts about it.

    • When you return to school, you will write a reflection paper summarizing the events that took place on a global scale over the summer and think about your future as you prepare to graduate.

    -OR-


    Option C: Employment Journal

    If you were employed over the summer, keep a journal about your work experience.  Write down the positives, negatives, and any learning experiences you had.  Is the job you had one that you would want to pursue as a career? Or was it simply to make some money during your summer break?

    • Write about one page per week, and summarize your experience.

    • When you return to school, you will turn in your employment journal and write a reflection paper based on your employment and what your future goals are.


    ENGLISH 12 CP – Multicultural Literature

    The 12th grade English course provides a study of British literature.  The following list of works by British authors includes psychoanalytic, feminist, and Marxist texts from a variety of literary eras.

    English 12CP students must read a total of TWO of the following works:

    Starred* titles are available in electronic book form on Overdrive.  See our school library website for more information.

    There is one REQUIRED text:

    • 1984 by George Orwell*

    Additionally, English 12 CP students should choose ONE of the following books to read:

    As you read, you will maintain a double-entry journal, either in hard copy or electronic format, including at least five key passages from EACH chosen novel (total of 10).  Please follow the sample format below. Your journal should not simply summarize the text, but show your thinking and your responses to the reading.  Key passages should make someone unfamiliar with the book want to read it, or find out more about it.  Bring your journal with you on the first day of school.  You will be completing a summer reading assignment/project during the first week.

    Sample Double-Entry Journal Entries:

    From House on Mango Street

    Key Passage

    Metacognitive Log Response

    “The house on Mango Street is ours, and we don’t have to pay rent to anybody, or share the yard with the people downstairs, or be careful not to make too much noise, and there isn’t a landlord banging on the ceiling with a broom” (3).

    The point is she is listing situations that people who rent homes and apartments experience.  I made a connection to this because we used to live in an apartment that my mom rented when I was younger.  I started to think about how proud we were of our house once we bought it and realized that the character feels the same way in her new home.

    Metacognitive Log Prompts/Stems to help get you started:

    • I felt confused when…and so I…

    • I remembered that earlier in the text…

    • A word/some words I did not know:

    • I figured out that…

    • I first thought…but then realized…

    • I finally understood…because…

    • A connection I made:

    • A prediction I made was…because…

    • I was surprised when…because

    IMPORTANT!

    You will be assessed on the required readings during the first week of school.


    HONORS ENGLISH 12 – British Literature

    The 12th grade English course provides a study of British literature with a focus on diversity.  The following list of works by British authors includes a range of texts from classic and contemporary fiction to nonfiction and drama.

    HONORS ENGLISH 12 students must read FOUR titles in all from the following groups:

    Starred* titles are available in electronic book form on Overdrive.  See our school library website for more information.

    GROUP A – REQUIRED TEXTS (Must read ALL THREE.)

    Nonfiction

    Fiction

    • 1984 by George Orwell*

    GROUP B – Contemporary Novels (Choose ONE)

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. Please join the Honors English 12 (2017-18) Google Classroom using the code r6jzvon. assignments should be completed in Spartandocs (not Word or Pages) and submitted via the assignments posted in Classroom on or before the first day of class. Students are encouraged to pace themselves and post throughout the summer months, not wait until the last minute!

    2. REQUIRED TEXTS:

      1. As you read Outliers, you will maintain a metacognitive response journal, to be updated throughout the text, with a minimum of one entry per chapter (including the introduction and the epilogue) PLUS a final reflection upon the completion of the text.  Your journal should not summarize the text, but show your thinking and your reactions to the reading.

      2. Take time to explore and learn from the tips provided on CollegeBoard’s Big Future: Essay site. Use what you learn to write a complete 1-2 page first draft of a college application essay in response to any prompt on the Common Application, or the college of your choice.

      3. For the the required novel 1984, please record active reading notes, including your reflections and inferences regarding character, theme, connections, significant quotes, etc. (Your preparation will be essential to your success on assignments and discussions in the first week.) Upon the conclusion of the novel, please write a one-paragraph (8-10 sentences) reflection on the novel as a whole. Submit only your reflection on Google Classroom on or before the first day of class, and bring your notes to our first class.

    3. CHOICE TEXT: Choose one of the three contemporary titles. As you read, take active reading notes regarding character, theme, likes, dislikes, notable literary devices, significant passages, etc. These notes will aid your discussion and help you with your assignment during the first week of school. Upon your completion of the novel, please write a one-paragraph (8-10 sentences) reflection on the novel as a whole. Submit only your reflection to Google Classroom on or before the first day of class, and bring your active reading notes with you to our first class.

    4. Please see Mrs. Spritzer in Room 122 prior to the last day of school with any questions. You may also email Mrs. Spritzer at spritzerm@slsd.org at any time during the summer.


    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE

    The following works by American, British, and world authors are recommended by the College Board.

    Starred* titles are available in electronic book form on Overdrive.  See our school library website for more information.

    AP ENGLISH students must read a TOTAL of THREE books from the following categories:

        Feminist Criticism (REQUIRED)

        Marxist Criticism (REQUIRED)

    • 1984 by George Orwell*

    Psychoanalytic Criticism (Choose ONE)

    Directions:

    Students will complete a series of assessments on the assigned summer reading, each designed to emulate the structure and rigor of each component of the AP Exam. Though no formal notes or journals will be collected, the assessments REQUIRE students to record detailed active reading notes that focus on Character, Theme, and Rhetoric while completing their summer reading. Additionally, students MUST print and review the lists of rhetorical, literary, and poetry terms in the document entitled “AP Terms” on the AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION page of Mr. Castagna’s website. Because many of these terms will be new to you and a full understanding of them is ESSENTIAL to your success on the AP Test, you will be assessed on your ability to APPLY these terms to your reading beginning with your very FIRST summer reading assessment. It is strongly recommended that you RECORD examples of these terms as part of your note-taking while you complete your summer reading. Students who do not begin to actively identify examples of these key terms in their reading will find themselves underprepared for the summer reading assessments and for the course itself. PLEASE SEE MR. CASTAGNA IN ROOM 123 PRIOR TO THE END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS.

    IMPORTANT!

    You will be assessed on the required readings during the first week of school.

    Assessments will encompass all three works with the structure and rigor of the AP Test. Assessments will be comprised of the following:

    • Multiple Choice Questions

    • Passage-based Critical Reading

    • Formal Essay